STUDY OF PEDIATRIC INJURIES: PATTERNS AND OUTCOME

Authors

  • Yasir. B. Elshambaty MD Surgery, ALBaha University, Faculty of Medicine.

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.32553/ijmbs.v3i8.485

Keywords:

pediatric injuries, injury patterns, household

Abstract

Purpose this study aims to show the patterns and outcome of pediatric injury among those living in Albaha region in Saudi Arabia

Methods this is a cross-sectional descriptive household-based study, included children between 0-17 years old both male and female. The data were collected with structured questionnaire between 20 Nov – 20 Dec 2018 and  analyzed with SPSS version 25

Results the total of participants was 257 injured child. 199(77.4%) are male and 58(22.6%) are female. About 44%of them were injured at pre-school level and 56% were traumatized at school age. The least incidence of injury occurred in those less than 2 yrs and higher incidence in those between 3-10 yrs old. The most common mechanism of injury was falling from height. The most affected group age by RTA accidents was 11-17 yrs old. Approximately 83% of the injured children required hospital management. Only one third of the injuries were  associated complications. The most common injured anatomic part was the upper limb and the least affected part was the spine. Only 5% of the injuries were associated with a disability and the common was loss of organ or part of it. Paralysis occurred in less than 1% and head injury resulted in disabilities more than 1%.

Conclusion the vast majority of the injuries in our participants are not serious. The severe injuries were associated with RTA-related trauma. Most of injuries due to falling from height are not serious. We recommend not to allow the children to drive cars.

Keywords: pediatric injuries; injury patterns; household.

Downloads

Published

2019-08-23

How to Cite

Elshambaty, Y. B. (2019). STUDY OF PEDIATRIC INJURIES: PATTERNS AND OUTCOME. International Journal of Medical and Biomedical Studies, 3(8), 170-174. https://doi.org/10.32553/ijmbs.v3i8.485

Issue

Section

Research Articles