IMAGING OF INTRACRANIAL SPACE OCCUPYING LESIONS

Authors

  • Saroj Kumari Assistant Professor, Department of Radiodiagnosis, S M S Medical College & Associate Group of Hospitals, Jaipur
  • Raghav Kumar Assistant Professor, Department of Radiodiagnosis, S M S Medical College & Associate Group of Hospitals, Jaipur

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.32553/ijmbs.v5i11.2309

Keywords:

Brain, CT, MRIs

Abstract

Introduction: With advanced MRI techniques such as perfusion, diffusion, and spectroscopy, it is now possible to differentiate between various intracranial lesions.

Materials and Methods: This prospective cohort study was conducted on 50 patients referred by various clinical departments with clinical suspicion of intracranial space occupying lesions, evaluated by computed tomography & magnetic resonance imaging.

Result: Solitary lesions were present in 35 patients (70%) & multiple lesions in 15 patients (30%). 68.00% lesions were Supratentorial & 32.00% infratentorial in location. Most common supratentorial location in adults was frontal lobe 40% followed by parietal lobe 30%. Most common supratentorial locations in children were frontal lobe. Infratentorially, cerebellum & posterior fossa were found to be most common location in adults & children respectively. Supratentorial lesions were most common both in adults & children. 60% lesions were intraaxial & 40 % extra axial in location. In adults, intraaxial lesions were more common than in children.

Conclusion: Intracranial space occupying lesions comprise of a diverse group of lesions. With the introduction of CT & MRI scanning, imaging of lesions has acquired a new dimension whereby excellent anatomical detail in axial, sagittal & coronal planes as well as lesion characterization has become possible.

Key words: Brain, CT, MRIs

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Published

2021-11-23

How to Cite

Kumari, S. ., & Kumar, R. . (2021). IMAGING OF INTRACRANIAL SPACE OCCUPYING LESIONS. International Journal of Medical and Biomedical Studies, 5(11). https://doi.org/10.32553/ijmbs.v5i11.2309

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